Thursday, April 28, 2011

HOW TO CHANGE (NOT MASK) YOUR IP ADDRESS

For whatever reason, you want to change your IP address. How do you do it? Well, there are many different methods. Some may work for you but may not work for someone else, and vice versa. I'm going to cover how to change your IP address in Windows 2000, Windows 2003, XP, Vista and Windows 7.

But first of all, what is IP Lease Time?  
"IP lease time" is how long your ISP determines you’ll be assigned a specific IP. Some IP lease times only a few minutes. Others are set to a few days. Some IP lease times are set for as long as a year or more. The IP lease time setting is entirely up to your ISP.
One of the easier methods to change your IP address is to turn off your modem/router/computer overnight. Then turn it back on the following morning. This method WILL NOT work if your ISP has a long lease time set for your IP.




If your connection is *DIRECT* to your computer and your computer gets the public IP and not a router, you can try this:
For Windows 2000, XP, and 2003
1. Click Start
2. Click Run
3. Type in cmd and hit ok (this opens a Command Prompt)
4. Type ipconfig /release and hit enter
5. Click Start, Control Panel, and open Network Connections
6. Find and Right click on the active Local Area Connection and choose Properties
7. Double-click on the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
8. Click on Use the following IP address
9. Enter a false IP like 123.123.123.123
10. Press Tab and the Subnet Mask section will populate with default numbers
11. Hit OK twice
12. Right click the active Local Area Connection again and choose Properties
13. Double-click on the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
14. Choose Obtain an IP address automatically
15. Hit OK twice
16. Go to IPchicken to see if you have a new IP address


For Vista (Windows 7 is very similar)
1. Click Start
2. Click All Programs expand the Accessories menu
3. In the Accessories menu, Right Click Command Prompt and choose Run as administrator
4. Type ipconfig /release and hit enter
5. Click Start, Control Panel, and open Network and Sharing Center. Depending on your view, you may have to click Network and Internet      before you see the Network and Sharing Center icon
6. From the Tasks menu on the left, choose Manage Network Connections
7. Find and Right click on the active Local Area Connection and choose Properties (If you’re hit with a UAC prompt, choose Continue)
8. Double-click on Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4)
9. Click on Use the following IP address
10. Enter a false IP like 123.123.123.123
11. Press Tab and the Subnet Mask section will populate with default numbers
12. Hit OK twice
13. Right click the active Local Area Connection again and choose Properties
14. Double-click on Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4)
15. Choose Obtain an IP address automatically
16. Hit OK twice
17. Go to IPchicken to see if you have a new IP address



Did it work? Do you have a different method? Leave me a comment!





73 comments:

  1. This is awesome! Now I know where to go if I ever need an IP change.

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  2. Awesome, thanks :D Been trying different methods, but none of them worked for me.. Will give it a shot ^^

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  3. This is good stuff to know for websites or games that ban by IP.

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  4. thanks for the info bro really helpful =)

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  5. I use this method all the time. It works.

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  6. Very helpful post, I'm sure this will come in handy someday.

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  7. That's awesome. I had a class about network infrastructure, but we never really talked about how to change this stuff - just how it works. Thanks man!

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  8. I once had the misfortune to be assigned an IP that had been banned by some sites

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  9. Great guide, used a few like it before, always handy to know

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  10. Hey, thanks for the great tip :)

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  11. nice tutorials here!
    following ;)

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  12. great info, very helpful thank you

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  13. You should also post about changing your MAC adress.

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  14. well.. i dont really want to change my IP.. but awesome either way!

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  15. this is useful info. thanks.

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  16. I already knew about how to do this, and my ISP has a long lease time. However I already called them once in the past and they told me how to reset the time for their system. Wasnt even looking for them to tell me that, I just wanted them to stop the Internet from crashing infrequently...

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  17. Good to know. I'll never remember this, but at least I tried

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  18. good stuff, thanks for the heads up

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  19. Cool blog, keep up the good work!

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  20. Thanks for info bro... following :)

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  21. Very well written, Will try try it now.

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  22. Saved this for future use, you never know when you'll need to change your IP fast :>

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  23. Thanks for the info, was looking for something like it

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  24. Hey man, keep it up with the tips and tricks, they definitely seem worthwhile, and I'll be following.

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  25. followed, facinating blog, keep it coming, will be checking daily!

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  26. nice i'm sure this could be helpful someday

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  27. That was really informative!

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  28. That was really informative!

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  29. I was just trying to do this the other day. thanks!

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  30. actually pretty good guide

    usefull. thanks!

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  31. thanks! I think this will be helpful when downloading from rapid

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  32. lol last time i changed my ip adress i made a mess

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  33. This is amazing. I have never heard of something like that before. I have to try out but I'am not good at these things.

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  34. it didn't work for me :(

    seems like it worked for others though so great guide!

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  35. Good guide + I sometimes use web proxies

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  36. I love the direction this blog is going!~

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  37. This is becoming a very handy blog

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  38. Thanks for the info, I check back here a lot, as this info is very handy

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  39. Im sick of explaining this to my friends, I'll just link them this from now on, good post

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  40. Thanks for the info. If I ever need to mask my ip, now I know where to go haha.

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  41. I have a script that restarts my router

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  42. Nice dude post, just my daily morning coffee blogwalking

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  43. Awesome, I actually used to know this and just kinda forgot it, appreciate the memory refresh though haha.

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  44. cool, but my isp have dinamic ip :P thanks anyways :D

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  45. Haven't tried this in ages. It worked! good tut.

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  46. This worked perfectly! thanks!

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  47. that is so awesome :D thanks mate!

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  48. Don't know if I'll ever have use for this, but our government just passed a new law taking all our online privacy rights away, so I do think I'll keep this is mind along with TOR button and such. Paranoia and a reason to be paranoid is a bad combination

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  49. awesome post, very helpful. Thanks. Following ;D

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  50. Damn. Didn't work. I need this to get around an unjust ban : /

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  51. Will be certain to try this

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